Homeowner Gary Gless leans over his balcony, as drilling wells are seen in the background, in Los Angeles, California December 11, 2013. The United States has a long history of keeping industrial ... more 
Homeowner Gary Gless leans over his balcony, as drilling wells are seen in the background, in Los Angeles, California December 11, 2013. The United States has a long history of keeping industrial activity out of middle and upper-middle-class residential neighborhoods. But that is starting to change with the spread of new technology for oil and gas drilling, such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking." Freeport-McMoRan, part of Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc, said that, for the past three years, its surveys of the oilfield and surrounding communities have found no connection between its activities and "localized claims of property damage." It said it would continue to evaluate the issue. Picture taken December 11, 2013. To match Analysis FRACKING-HOMEOWNERS/ REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS ENERGY) less 
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Reuters | Photo By MARIO ANZUONI / REUTERS
Thu, Dec 12, 2013 9:29 AM EST