IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR WWF-Canon - One of 16 tiger cubs seized from smugglers on Friday, Oct. 26, 2012, in Chaiyaphum, Thailand. A veterinary team from a wildlife forensic unit is taking blood samples to trace the tigerÕs DNA. It is believed that this cub was reared in an illegal tiger farm in Thailand and destined for China. Perceived by organized criminals to be high profit and low risk, the illicit trade in wildlife is worth at least US$ 19 billion per year, making it the fourth largest illegal global trade after narcotics, counterfeiting, and human trafficking, according to a new report commissioned by WWF. Besides driving many endangered species towards extinction, illegal wildlife trade strengthens criminal networks, undermines national security, and poses increasing risks to global health, according to the WWF report, Fighting illicit wildlife trafficking: A consultation with governments, which will be unveiled today at a briefing for United Nations ambassadors in New York. (WWF-Canon/James Morgan via AP Images)

Associated Press
IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR WWF-Canon - One of 16 tiger cubs seized from smugglers on Friday, Oct. 26, 2012, in Chaiyaphum, Thailand. A  veterinary team from a wildlife forensic unit is taking blood samples to trace the tigerÕs DNA. It is believed that this cub was reared in an illegal tiger farm in Thailand and destined for China. Perceived by organized criminals to be high profit and low risk, the illicit trade in wildlife is worth at least US$ 19 billion per year, making it the fourth largest illegal global trade after narcotics, counterfeiting, and human trafficking, according to a new report commissioned by WWF. Besides driving many endangered species towards extinction, illegal wildlife trade strengthens criminal networks, undermines national security, and poses increasing risks to global health, according to the WWF report, Fighting illicit wildlife trafficking: A consultation with governments, which will be unveiled today at a briefing for United Nations ambassadors in New York. (WWF-Canon/James Morgan via AP Images)
IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR WWF-Canon - One of 16 tiger cubs seized from smugglers on Friday, Oct. 26, 2012, in Chaiyaphum, Thailand. A veterinary team from a wildlife forensic unit is taking blood samples to trace the tigerÕs DNA. It is believed that this cub was reared in an illegal tiger farm in Thailand and destined for China. Perceived by organized criminals to be high profit and low risk, the illicit trade in wildlife is worth at least US$ 19 billion per year, making it the fourth largest illegal global trade after narcotics, counterfeiting, and human trafficking, according to a new report commissioned by WWF. Besides driving many endangered species towards extinction, illegal wildlife trade strengthens criminal networks, undermines national security, and poses increasing risks to global health, according to the WWF report, Fighting illicit wildlife trafficking: A consultation with governments, which will be unveiled today at a briefing for United Nations ambassadors in New York. (WWF-Canon/James Morgan via AP Images)
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