In this image release by the Stanford News Service, Brian Kobilka talks on the telephone to reporters after receiving news of his Nobel Prize in Chemistry at his home in Palo Alto, Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012. Kobilka and Duke University professor Robert Lefkowitz won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for studies of protein receptors that let body cells sense and respond to outside signals like danger or the flavor of food. Such studies are key for developing better drugs. (AP Photo/Stanford News Service, Linda A. Cicero) MANDATORY CREDIT

Associated Press
In this image release by the Stanford News Service, Brian Kobilka talks on the telephone to reporters after receiving news of his Nobel Prize in Chemistry at his home in Palo Alto, Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012. Kobilka and Duke University professor Robert Lefkowitz won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for studies of protein receptors that let body cells sense and respond to outside signals like danger or the flavor of food. Such studies are key for developing better drugs. (AP Photo/Stanford News Service, Linda A. Cicero) MANDATORY CREDIT
In this image release by the Stanford News Service, Brian Kobilka talks on the telephone to reporters after receiving news of his Nobel Prize in Chemistry at his home in Palo Alto, Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012. Kobilka and Duke University professor Robert Lefkowitz won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for studies of protein receptors that let body cells sense and respond to outside signals like danger or the flavor of food. Such studies are key for developing better drugs. (AP Photo/Stanford News Service, Linda A. Cicero) MANDATORY CREDIT
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