This image released by the journal Science shows Lee R. Berger of the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa holding the cranium of Australopithecus sediba. A detailed analysis of 2 million-year-old bones found in South Africa offers the most powerful case so far in identifying the transitional figure that came before modern humans, findings some are calling a potential game-changer in understanding evolution. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Lee Berger and the University of Witwatersrand)

Associated Press
This image released by the journal Science shows Lee R. Berger of the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa holding the cranium of Australopithecus sediba. A detailed analysis of 2 million-year-old bones found in South Africa offers the most powerful case so far in identifying the transitional figure that came before modern humans, findings some are calling a potential game-changer in understanding evolution.  (AP Photo/Courtesy of Lee Berger and the University of Witwatersrand)
This image released by the journal Science shows Lee R. Berger of the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa holding the cranium of Australopithecus sediba. A detailed analysis of 2 million-year-old bones found in South Africa offers the most powerful case so far in identifying the transitional figure that came before modern humans, findings some are calling a potential game-changer in understanding evolution. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Lee Berger and the University of Witwatersrand)
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