In this image released by the New Progressive Party, Puerto Rico's Gov. Luis Fortuno shows his ballot to the press as he votes at a polling station in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Puerto Ricans are electing a governor as the U.S. island territory does not get a vote in the U.S. presidential election. But they are also casting ballots in a referendum that asks voters if they want to change the relationship to the United States. A second question gives voters three alternatives: become the 51st U.S. state, independence, or "sovereign free association," a designation that would give more autonomy. (AP Photo/New Progressive Party, Jerry Guillen)

Associated Press
In this image released by the New Progressive Party, Puerto Rico's Gov. Luis Fortuno shows his ballot to the press as he votes at a polling station in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Puerto Ricans are electing a governor as the U.S. island territory does not get a vote in the U.S. presidential election. But they are also casting ballots in a referendum that asks voters if they want to change the relationship to the United States. A second question gives voters three alternatives: become the 51st U.S. state, independence, or "sovereign free association," a designation that would give more autonomy. (AP Photo/New Progressive Party, Jerry Guillen)
In this image released by the New Progressive Party, Puerto Rico's Gov. Luis Fortuno shows his ballot to the press as he votes at a polling station in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Puerto Ricans are electing a governor as the U.S. island territory does not get a vote in the U.S. presidential election. But they are also casting ballots in a referendum that asks voters if they want to change the relationship to the United States. A second question gives voters three alternatives: become the 51st U.S. state, independence, or "sovereign free association," a designation that would give more autonomy. (AP Photo/New Progressive Party, Jerry Guillen)
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