An iron sits on the shelf at Aubuchon Hardware, Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, in Montpelier, Vt. When toymaker Hasbro axed the clothes iron token from its Monopoly game at the suggestion of online voters – replacing it with a cat – the company implied that the small household appliance was passe: something your grandmother once used to ease the wrinkles out of socks and handkerchiefs. Even with the rise of “wrinkle-free,” the iron, it seems, is holding its own. While sales in the U.S. declined in volume 1 percent last year, they were up nearly 3 percent overall between 2007 and 2012, according to Euromonitor International. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

Associated Press
An iron sits on the shelf at Aubuchon Hardware, Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, in Montpelier, Vt. When toymaker Hasbro axed the clothes iron token from its Monopoly game at the suggestion of online voters – replacing it with a cat – the company implied that the small household appliance was passe: something your grandmother once used to ease the wrinkles out of socks and handkerchiefs. Even with the rise of “wrinkle-free,” the iron, it seems, is holding its own. While sales in the U.S. declined in volume 1 percent last year, they were up nearly 3 percent overall between 2007 and 2012, according to Euromonitor International. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
An iron sits on the shelf at Aubuchon Hardware, Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, in Montpelier, Vt. When toymaker Hasbro axed the clothes iron token from its Monopoly game at the suggestion of online voters – replacing it with a cat – the company implied that the small household appliance was passe: something your grandmother once used to ease the wrinkles out of socks and handkerchiefs. Even with the rise of “wrinkle-free,” the iron, it seems, is holding its own. While sales in the U.S. declined in volume 1 percent last year, they were up nearly 3 percent overall between 2007 and 2012, according to Euromonitor International. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
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