Jake Finkbonner, of Ferndale, Washington, center, is hugged by his mother Elsa, as his father Donny looks at them, after an interview with the Associated Press, in Rome, Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012. Jake was infected with a flesh-eating bacteria in 2006, when he was five years old, and his prognosis was so grave that his parents had last rites performed and were discussing donating his organs. The Vatican determined that Jake’s cure was a miracle due to the intercession of Kateri Tekakwitha, a 17th century Native American who is among seven people who will be declared saints on Sunday by Pope Benedict XVI. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Associated Press
Jake Finkbonner, of Ferndale, Washington, center, is hugged by his mother  Elsa, as his father Donny looks at them, after an interview with the Associated Press, in Rome, Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012.  Jake was infected with a flesh-eating bacteria in 2006, when he was five years old, and his prognosis was so grave that his parents had last rites performed and were discussing donating his organs. The Vatican determined that Jake’s cure was a miracle due to the intercession of Kateri Tekakwitha, a 17th century Native American who is among seven people who will be declared saints on Sunday by Pope Benedict XVI. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
Jake Finkbonner, of Ferndale, Washington, center, is hugged by his mother Elsa, as his father Donny looks at them, after an interview with the Associated Press, in Rome, Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012. Jake was infected with a flesh-eating bacteria in 2006, when he was five years old, and his prognosis was so grave that his parents had last rites performed and were discussing donating his organs. The Vatican determined that Jake’s cure was a miracle due to the intercession of Kateri Tekakwitha, a 17th century Native American who is among seven people who will be declared saints on Sunday by Pope Benedict XVI. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
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