In this Jan. 13, 2011 photo, retired New York City Det. John Walcott, left, and Det. Richard Volpe pose for a portrait in Tarrytown, N.Y. Volpe and Walcott spent 9/11 breathing in clouds of soot at ... more 
In this Jan. 13, 2011 photo, retired New York City Det. John Walcott, left, and Det. Richard Volpe pose for a portrait in Tarrytown, N.Y. Volpe and Walcott spent 9/11 breathing in clouds of soot at the World Trade Center. Yet that is no guarantee that the ex-cops, or many others like them, will qualify for a substantial share of the $2.78 billion Congress has set to compensate people who fell ill after being exposed to ground zero toxins. Like thousands of other rescue and recovery workers, Volpe suffers from an ailment that is not expressly covered by the law. Only a few diseases were singled out by name in the act, including asthma, certain types of lung disease and a handful of other respiratory ailments. They were included because research has suggested there is a link between those illnesses and the tons of caustic dust that blanketed lower Manhattan after the twin towers collapsed. Volpe's old partner in the detective bureau, John Walcott, is in a similar situation. He was diagnosed in 2003 with acute myelogenous leukemia. less 
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Associated Press | Photo By Craig Ruttle
Sun, Jan 16, 2011 4:11 PM EST