In this Jan. 24, 2013, an inmate in an isolation cell, right, talks to attorney Miguel Angel Ortiz, president of Conaprev, the national mechanism to prevent torture, at the prison in Comayagua, Honduras. A year after one of the century's worst prison fires killed more than 350 people, the investigation remains open and prosecutors have filed no charges. The burned cells and electrical system are still being repaired. Even the inmate who was the hero of the fire, finding keys and freeing hundreds of men, was never pardoned as President Porfirio Lobo had promised. (AP Photo/Alberto Arce)

Associated Press
In this Jan. 24, 2013, an inmate in an isolation cell, right, talks to attorney Miguel Angel Ortiz, president of Conaprev, the national mechanism to prevent torture, at the prison in Comayagua, Honduras. A year after one of the century's worst prison fires killed more than 350 people, the investigation remains open and prosecutors have filed no charges. The burned cells and electrical system are still being repaired. Even the inmate who was the hero of the fire, finding keys and freeing hundreds of men, was never pardoned as President Porfirio Lobo had promised. (AP Photo/Alberto Arce)
In this Jan. 24, 2013, an inmate in an isolation cell, right, talks to attorney Miguel Angel Ortiz, president of Conaprev, the national mechanism to prevent torture, at the prison in Comayagua, Honduras. A year after one of the century's worst prison fires killed more than 350 people, the investigation remains open and prosecutors have filed no charges. The burned cells and electrical system are still being repaired. Even the inmate who was the hero of the fire, finding keys and freeing hundreds of men, was never pardoned as President Porfirio Lobo had promised. (AP Photo/Alberto Arce)
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