In this Jan. 27, 2013, photo, famous Russian conductor and viola player Yuri Bashmet speaks before a concert marking his 60th birthday in Moscow, Russia. When Bashmet declared that he "adored" President Vladimir Putin, he stirred little controversy in a country where classical musicians have often curried favor with the political elite. But political drama spilled into the orchestra pit last month when Bashmet refused to condemn a new law prohibiting Americans from adopting Russian children, and in response the beloved singer Sergei Nikitin canceled his appearance at a concert celebrating the violist’s 60th birthday. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze)

Associated Press
In this Jan. 27, 2013, photo, famous Russian conductor and viola player Yuri Bashmet speaks before a concert marking his 60th birthday in Moscow, Russia. When Bashmet declared that he "adored" President Vladimir Putin, he stirred little controversy in a country where classical musicians have often curried favor with the political elite. But political drama spilled into the orchestra pit last month when Bashmet refused to condemn a new law prohibiting Americans from adopting Russian children, and in response the beloved singer Sergei Nikitin canceled his appearance at a concert celebrating the violist’s 60th birthday. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze)
In this Jan. 27, 2013, photo, famous Russian conductor and viola player Yuri Bashmet speaks before a concert marking his 60th birthday in Moscow, Russia. When Bashmet declared that he "adored" President Vladimir Putin, he stirred little controversy in a country where classical musicians have often curried favor with the political elite. But political drama spilled into the orchestra pit last month when Bashmet refused to condemn a new law prohibiting Americans from adopting Russian children, and in response the beloved singer Sergei Nikitin canceled his appearance at a concert celebrating the violist’s 60th birthday. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze)
View Comments (0)