In this Jan. 30, 2013 photo, Drew and Frances Pardus-Abbadessa pose for 

In this Jan. 30, 2013 photo, Drew and Frances Pardus-Abbadessa pose for a picture with their son, Pavol, 1, in the nursery originally intended for a child they have been trying to adopt for five years, at their apartment in New York.  The boy's Russian name is Vladimir,  but they hope one day to be able to name him Franco Michael ,  the name still displayed on the wall. The Pardus-Abbadessa family were among a group initially known as the "Kyrgyz 65" - Americans who were in the process of adopting 65 orphans from the Central Asian republic when it suspended international adoptions in 2008 due to allegations of fraud.  Some of the children were placed in domestic adoptions, and last summer nine of the remaining children finally were allowed to go to America. The Pardus-Abbadessas are now among 16 U.S. families still waiting. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Associated Press
In this Jan. 30, 2013 photo, Drew and Frances Pardus-Abbadessa pose for a picture with their son, Pavol, 1, in the nursery originally intended for a child they have been trying to adopt for five years, at their apartment in New York. The boy's Russian name is Vladimir, but they hope one day to be able to name him Franco Michael , the name still displayed on the wall. The Pardus-Abbadessa family were among a group initially known as the "Kyrgyz 65" - Americans who were in the process of adopting 65 orphans from the Central Asian republic when it suspended international adoptions in 2008 due to allegations of fraud. Some of the children were placed in domestic adoptions, and last summer nine of the remaining children finally were allowed to go to America. The Pardus-Abbadessas are now among 16 U.S. families still waiting. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
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