In this Jan. 7, 2013 photo, people wait to apply for passports at an immigration office in Havana, Cuba. The overhaul of Cuba's decades-old migratory law, announced three months ago, is perhaps the most highly anticipated of a series of reforms initiated under President Raul Castro. It eliminates the hated “white card” exit visa that Cuba long forced its citizens to apply for before they could leave the island, something that led opponents to refer to the communist-run country as an “island prison.” (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)

Associated Press
In this Jan. 7, 2013 photo, people wait to apply for passports at an immigration office in Havana, Cuba. The overhaul of Cuba's decades-old migratory law, announced three months ago, is perhaps the most highly anticipated of a series of reforms initiated under President Raul Castro. It eliminates the hated “white card” exit visa that Cuba long forced its citizens to apply for before they could leave the island, something that led opponents to refer to the communist-run country as an “island prison.” (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
In this Jan. 7, 2013 photo, people wait to apply for passports at an immigration office in Havana, Cuba. The overhaul of Cuba's decades-old migratory law, announced three months ago, is perhaps the most highly anticipated of a series of reforms initiated under President Raul Castro. It eliminates the hated “white card” exit visa that Cuba long forced its citizens to apply for before they could leave the island, something that led opponents to refer to the communist-run country as an “island prison.” (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
View Comments (0)