Japan's main opposition Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) President Shinzo Abe acknowledges the crowd during a campaign rally for the Dec. 16 parliamentary elections in Kawaguchi, near Tokyo, Saturday, Dec. 15, 2012. The LDP ruled Japan almost continuously since 1955 until it lost badly to the DPJ in 2009. If the LDP wins on Sunday, it would give the nationalistic Abe, who was prime minister from 2006-2007, the top job again. His hawkish views raise questions about how that might affect ties with rival China amid a territorial dispute over a cluster of tiny islands claimed by both countries. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye)

Associated Press
Japan's main opposition Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) President Shinzo Abe acknowledges the crowd during a campaign rally for the Dec. 16 parliamentary elections in Kawaguchi, near Tokyo, Saturday, Dec. 15, 2012. The LDP ruled Japan almost continuously since 1955 until it lost badly to the DPJ in 2009. If the LDP wins on Sunday, it would give the nationalistic Abe, who was prime minister from 2006-2007, the top job again. His hawkish views raise questions about how that might affect ties with rival China amid a territorial dispute over a cluster of tiny islands claimed by both countries. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye)
Japan's main opposition Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) President Shinzo Abe acknowledges the crowd during a campaign rally for the Dec. 16 parliamentary elections in Kawaguchi, near Tokyo, Saturday, Dec. 15, 2012. The LDP ruled Japan almost continuously since 1955 until it lost badly to the DPJ in 2009. If the LDP wins on Sunday, it would give the nationalistic Abe, who was prime minister from 2006-2007, the top job again. His hawkish views raise questions about how that might affect ties with rival China amid a territorial dispute over a cluster of tiny islands claimed by both countries. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye)
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