Jim Hendler, who heads the computer science department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, poses next to the the supercomputer Watson at the Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013, in Troy, N.Y. Watson, the question-answering supercomputer best known for beating human champions on "Jeopardy!,” is going to college. IBM is announcing Wednesday that it will provide a Watson system to RPI, the first time a version of the computer is being sent to a university. The avatar on the computer screen at left represented Watson on "Jeopardy!.” (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

Associated Press
Jim Hendler, who heads the computer science department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, poses next to the the supercomputer Watson at the Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013, in Troy, N.Y. Watson, the question-answering supercomputer best known for beating human champions on "Jeopardy!,” is going to college. IBM is announcing Wednesday that it will provide a Watson system to RPI, the first time a version of the computer is being sent to a university. The avatar on the computer screen at left represented Watson on "Jeopardy!.” (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
Jim Hendler, who heads the computer science department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, poses next to the the supercomputer Watson at the Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013, in Troy, N.Y. Watson, the question-answering supercomputer best known for beating human champions on "Jeopardy!,” is going to college. IBM is announcing Wednesday that it will provide a Watson system to RPI, the first time a version of the computer is being sent to a university. The avatar on the computer screen at left represented Watson on "Jeopardy!.” (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
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