Judy Anderson irons a dress at the Sewing Basket, Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, in Montpelier, Vt. When toymaker Hasbro axed the clothes iron token from its Monopoly game at the suggestion of online voters – replacing it with a cat – the company implied that the small household appliance was passe: something your grandmother once used to ease the wrinkles out of socks and handkerchiefs. Even with the rise of “wrinkle-free,” the iron, it seems, is holding its own. While sales in the U.S. declined in volume 1 percent last year, they were up nearly 3 percent overall between 2007 and 2012, according to Euromonitor International. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

Associated Press
Judy Anderson irons a dress at the Sewing Basket, Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, in Montpelier, Vt. When toymaker Hasbro axed the clothes iron token from its Monopoly game at the suggestion of online voters – replacing it with a cat – the company implied that the small household appliance was passe: something your grandmother once used to ease the wrinkles out of socks and handkerchiefs. Even with the rise of “wrinkle-free,” the iron, it seems, is holding its own. While sales in the U.S. declined in volume 1 percent last year, they were up nearly 3 percent overall between 2007 and 2012, according to Euromonitor International. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
Judy Anderson irons a dress at the Sewing Basket, Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, in Montpelier, Vt. When toymaker Hasbro axed the clothes iron token from its Monopoly game at the suggestion of online voters – replacing it with a cat – the company implied that the small household appliance was passe: something your grandmother once used to ease the wrinkles out of socks and handkerchiefs. Even with the rise of “wrinkle-free,” the iron, it seems, is holding its own. While sales in the U.S. declined in volume 1 percent last year, they were up nearly 3 percent overall between 2007 and 2012, according to Euromonitor International. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
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