In this July 28, 2011 photo, geologist Sigurdur Reynir Gislason, the CarbFix experiment's chief scientist, holds examples of basalt rock, left, and limestone in his office at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik, Iceland. At a nearby geothermal plant, CarbFix scientists will separate carbon dioxide from a volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Associated Press
In this July 28, 2011 photo, geologist Sigurdur Reynir Gislason, the CarbFix experiment's chief scientist, holds examples of basalt rock, left, and limestone in his office at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik, Iceland. At a nearby geothermal plant, CarbFix scientists will separate carbon dioxide from a volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
In this July 28, 2011 photo, geologist Sigurdur Reynir Gislason, the CarbFix experiment's chief scientist, holds examples of basalt rock, left, and limestone in his office at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik, Iceland. At a nearby geothermal plant, CarbFix scientists will separate carbon dioxide from a volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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