In this June 1, 2013 photo, Honduras National Police officers and Honduras Army soldiers prepare for a patrol in the John F. Kennedy neighborhood in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The government of Honduras launched an unprecedented effort last year to clean up a U.S.-backed police force widely seen as deeply brutal and corrupt. One by one, hundreds of police officers were subjected to polygraph tests administered by Colombian technicians funded by the U.S. government. Nearly four of every 10 officers failed the test in the first five months it was administered, some giving answers that indicated that they had, among other violations, tortured suspects, accepted bribes and taken drugs, according to a confidential U.S. document provided to The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)

Associated Press
In this June 1, 2013 photo, Honduras National Police officers and Honduras Army soldiers prepare for a patrol in the John F. Kennedy neighborhood in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The government of Honduras launched an unprecedented effort last year to clean up a U.S.-backed police force widely seen as deeply brutal and corrupt. One by one, hundreds of police officers were subjected to polygraph tests administered by Colombian technicians funded by the U.S. government. Nearly four of every 10 officers failed the test in the first five months it was administered, some giving answers that indicated that they had, among other violations, tortured suspects, accepted bribes and taken drugs, according to a confidential U.S. document provided to The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
In this June 1, 2013 photo, Honduras National Police officers and Honduras Army soldiers prepare for a patrol in the John F. Kennedy neighborhood in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The government of Honduras launched an unprecedented effort last year to clean up a U.S.-backed police force widely seen as deeply brutal and corrupt. One by one, hundreds of police officers were subjected to polygraph tests administered by Colombian technicians funded by the U.S. government. Nearly four of every 10 officers failed the test in the first five months it was administered, some giving answers that indicated that they had, among other violations, tortured suspects, accepted bribes and taken drugs, according to a confidential U.S. document provided to The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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