In this June 1, 2013 photo, a National Police officer is reflected in the full-length mirror carried by a street vendor walking through l Mayoreo market in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. In the midst of a scandal over the police shooting of a university president's son, the government of Honduras launched an unprecedented effort last year to clean up a U.S.-backed police force widely seen as deeply brutal and corrupt. By April of this year, the Honduran government said it had dismissed a mere seven members of the 13,800-person force, a vivid illustration of the lack of progress in a year-old effort aided by the U.S. to reform police in a country that's swamped with U.S.-bound cocaine and wracked by one of the world's highest homicide rates. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)

Associated Press
In this June 1, 2013 photo, a National Police officer is reflected in the full-length mirror carried by a street vendor walking through l Mayoreo market in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. In the midst of a scandal over the police shooting of a university president's son, the government of Honduras launched an unprecedented effort last year to clean up a U.S.-backed police force widely seen as deeply brutal and corrupt. By April of this year, the Honduran government said it had dismissed a mere seven members of the 13,800-person force, a vivid illustration of the lack of progress in a year-old effort aided by the U.S. to reform police in a country that's swamped with U.S.-bound cocaine and wracked by one of the world's highest homicide rates. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
In this June 1, 2013 photo, a National Police officer is reflected in the full-length mirror carried by a street vendor walking through l Mayoreo market in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. In the midst of a scandal over the police shooting of a university president's son, the government of Honduras launched an unprecedented effort last year to clean up a U.S.-backed police force widely seen as deeply brutal and corrupt. By April of this year, the Honduran government said it had dismissed a mere seven members of the 13,800-person force, a vivid illustration of the lack of progress in a year-old effort aided by the U.S. to reform police in a country that's swamped with U.S.-bound cocaine and wracked by one of the world's highest homicide rates. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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