This June 9, 1912 photo courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey shows a refugee camp established by Captain Perry of the U.S. Revenue Service cutter Manning after the Novarupta-Katmai volcano eruption in Alaska. A century after one of the world's largest volcanic eruptions, ash and pumice are still plentiful in Alaska's Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes. The three-day explosion that began June 6, 1912, spewed ash 100,000 feet above the state's Katmai region, covering the valley to depths up to 700 feet. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey, G.C. Martin)

Associated Press
This June 9, 1912 photo courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey shows a refugee camp established by Captain Perry of the U.S. Revenue Service cutter Manning after the Novarupta-Katmai volcano eruption in Alaska. A century after one of the world's largest volcanic eruptions, ash and pumice are still plentiful in Alaska's Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes. The three-day explosion that began June 6, 1912, spewed ash 100,000 feet above the state's Katmai region, covering the valley to depths up to 700 feet. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey, G.C. Martin)
This June 9, 1912 photo courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey shows a refugee camp established by Captain Perry of the U.S. Revenue Service cutter Manning after the Novarupta-Katmai volcano eruption in Alaska. A century after one of the world's largest volcanic eruptions, ash and pumice are still plentiful in Alaska's Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes. The three-day explosion that began June 6, 1912, spewed ash 100,000 feet above the state's Katmai region, covering the valley to depths up to 700 feet. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey, G.C. Martin)
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