Karen King, a professor at Harvard Divinity School, is interviewed outside the Augustinianum institute where an international congress on Coptic studies is held in Rome, Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012. Scholars are questioning the authenticity and significance of a much-publicized discovery by a Harvard scholar who reported that a 4th Century fragment of papyrus has provided the first evidence that some early Christians believed Jesus was married. Karen King announced the finding Tuesday at an international congress on Coptic studies in Rome. Her paper, and the front-page attention it received in some U.S. newspapers, was very much a topic of conversation during the coffee breaks at the conference Wednesday. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Associated Press
Karen King, a professor at Harvard Divinity School, is interviewed outside the Augustinianum institute where an international congress on Coptic studies is held in Rome, Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012. Scholars are questioning the authenticity and significance of a much-publicized discovery by a Harvard scholar who reported that a 4th Century fragment of papyrus has provided the first evidence that some early Christians believed Jesus was married. Karen King announced the finding Tuesday at an international congress on Coptic studies in Rome. Her paper, and the front-page attention it received in some U.S. newspapers, was very much a topic of conversation during the coffee breaks at the conference Wednesday. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
Karen King, a professor at Harvard Divinity School, is interviewed outside the Augustinianum institute where an international congress on Coptic studies is held in Rome, Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012. Scholars are questioning the authenticity and significance of a much-publicized discovery by a Harvard scholar who reported that a 4th Century fragment of papyrus has provided the first evidence that some early Christians believed Jesus was married. Karen King announced the finding Tuesday at an international congress on Coptic studies in Rome. Her paper, and the front-page attention it received in some U.S. newspapers, was very much a topic of conversation during the coffee breaks at the conference Wednesday. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
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