Kieran Green, 16, poses for a photograph on a playing field in Edinburgh March 4, 2014. Kieren is undecided on how he will vote in the referendum and said, "I am not 100% convinced by the "Yes" or ... more 
Kieran Green, 16, poses for a photograph on a playing field in Edinburgh March 4, 2014. Kieren is undecided on how he will vote in the referendum and said, "I am not 100% convinced by the "Yes" or "No" campaigns and as to what will be better for the future of my country. You will have to look hard to find someone more patriotic than me, and when it all came about a few years ago I was all for independence. But growing up and maturing has made me rethink. My heart says yes, but my head says no." When Scotland's nationalist government dropped the voting age to 16 for this year's referendum on independence, it was widely seen as banking on teenage radicalism to ensure a break with the United Kingdom. If so, it may have miscalculated. Two opinion polls and Reuters interviews with 25 Scottish teenagers in 10 different locations suggest the ruling Scottish National Party (SNP) can't be sure of their support in the Sept. 18 referendum. Overall, polls show Scots remain doubtful about separation, although the proportion of those supporting independence has increased over the past year. Picture taken March 4, 2014. REUTERS/Paul Hackett (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS ELECTIONS) ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 16 OF 22 FOR PACKAGE 'SCOTLAND'S YOUNG VOTERS' TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'HACKETT YOUTH' less 
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Reuters | Photo By PAUL HACKETT / Reuters
Tue, May 6, 2014 6:06 AM EDT