Manioc roots of various shapes and sizes are displayed in a supermarket in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Monday, Dec. 17, 2012. Grown in some 80 countries worldwide and known internationally as yuca, cassava or mogo, manioc has its origins in Brazil: It was the main food source for indigenous tribes since before the discovery of the New World. Even now, manioc remains an important source of carbohydrates, especially among Brazil's working class, who grind it into a rich, nutty flour or deep-fry it into greasy fries. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

Associated Press
Manioc roots of various shapes and sizes are displayed in a supermarket in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Monday, Dec. 17, 2012.  Grown in some 80 countries worldwide and known internationally as yuca, cassava or mogo, manioc has its origins in Brazil: It was the main food source for indigenous tribes since before the discovery of the New World. Even now, manioc remains an important source of carbohydrates, especially among Brazil's working class, who grind it into a rich, nutty flour or deep-fry it into greasy fries. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
Manioc roots of various shapes and sizes are displayed in a supermarket in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Monday, Dec. 17, 2012. Grown in some 80 countries worldwide and known internationally as yuca, cassava or mogo, manioc has its origins in Brazil: It was the main food source for indigenous tribes since before the discovery of the New World. Even now, manioc remains an important source of carbohydrates, especially among Brazil's working class, who grind it into a rich, nutty flour or deep-fry it into greasy fries. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
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