In this March 15, 2011 photo taken and provided by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), smoke billows from Unit 3 reactor building after an explosion at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, following the March 11 tsunami and earthquake. The March 2011 catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. Nearly two years after the quake and tsunami disaster, the films are an attempt by the creative minds of Japan’s movie industry not only to confront the horrors of the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, but also as a legacy and to empower the victims by telling their story for international audiences. (AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.) EDITORIAL USE ONLY

Associated Press
In this March 15, 2011 photo taken and provided by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), smoke billows from Unit 3 reactor building after an explosion at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, following the March 11 tsunami and earthquake. The March 2011 catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. Nearly two years after the quake and tsunami disaster, the films are an attempt by the creative minds of Japan’s movie industry not only to confront the horrors of the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, but also as a legacy and to empower the victims by telling their story for international audiences. (AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
In this March 15, 2011 photo taken and provided by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), smoke billows from Unit 3 reactor building after an explosion at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, following the March 11 tsunami and earthquake. The March 2011 catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. Nearly two years after the quake and tsunami disaster, the films are an attempt by the creative minds of Japan’s movie industry not only to confront the horrors of the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, but also as a legacy and to empower the victims by telling their story for international audiences. (AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
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