In this March 2012 image released by Cynthia Leonor Garza, a batch of cascarones are shown at the home of Cynthia Leonor Garza in Washington, D.C. Cascarones are hollowed-out eggs that are dyed, decorated and filled with confetti, then covered with a colorful piece of tissue paper. At Easter time, families make or buy cascarones, which is Spanish for "eggshells," for crushing over each other's heads. The tradition came to the United States from Mexico, where cascarones were used during fiestas and other celebrations. In the United States, it has become primarily an Easter tradition. (AP Photo/Cynthia Leonor Garza)

Associated Press
In this March 2012 image released by Cynthia Leonor Garza, a batch of cascarones are shown at the home of Cynthia Leonor Garza in Washington, D.C. Cascarones are hollowed-out eggs that are dyed, decorated and filled with confetti, then covered with a colorful piece of tissue paper. At Easter time, families make or buy cascarones, which is Spanish for "eggshells," for crushing over each other's heads. The tradition came to the United States from Mexico, where cascarones were used during fiestas and other celebrations. In the United States, it has become primarily an Easter tradition. (AP Photo/Cynthia Leonor Garza)
In this March 2012 image released by Cynthia Leonor Garza, a batch of cascarones are shown at the home of Cynthia Leonor Garza in Washington, D.C. Cascarones are hollowed-out eggs that are dyed, decorated and filled with confetti, then covered with a colorful piece of tissue paper. At Easter time, families make or buy cascarones, which is Spanish for "eggshells," for crushing over each other's heads. The tradition came to the United States from Mexico, where cascarones were used during fiestas and other celebrations. In the United States, it has become primarily an Easter tradition. (AP Photo/Cynthia Leonor Garza)
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