In this March 27, 2013 photo, Cassie Quinlan, 69, poses for a photo in her Concord, Mass., home. Almost 40 years ago, Quinlan drove one of the Boston public school buses that took black students from the city’s Roxbury neighborhood to a predominantly white high school in Charlestown. She said that dozens of white protesters would line the curb and police would have to make a wall at the bus door so black students could get into school. Quinlan said her experiences opened her own eyes to black culture, and she became the first white member of a black gospel choir at a local university. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Associated Press
In this March 27, 2013 photo, Cassie Quinlan, 69, poses for a photo in her Concord, Mass., home. Almost 40 years ago, Quinlan drove one of the Boston public school buses that took black students from the city’s Roxbury neighborhood to a predominantly white high school in Charlestown. She said that dozens of white protesters would line the curb and police would have to make a wall at the bus door so black students could get into school. Quinlan said her experiences opened her own eyes to black culture, and she became the first white member of a black gospel choir at a local university.  (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
In this March 27, 2013 photo, Cassie Quinlan, 69, poses for a photo in her Concord, Mass., home. Almost 40 years ago, Quinlan drove one of the Boston public school buses that took black students from the city’s Roxbury neighborhood to a predominantly white high school in Charlestown. She said that dozens of white protesters would line the curb and police would have to make a wall at the bus door so black students could get into school. Quinlan said her experiences opened her own eyes to black culture, and she became the first white member of a black gospel choir at a local university. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
View Comments (0)