In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, puts his grandson Mohammed in a wheelchair in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and tragedy have each shaken Mohammed al-Farra’s life since he was born in the southern Gaza Strip town of Khan Younis three and a half years ago with a rare genetic disorder that crippled his bowels, weakened his immune system and caused an infection that destroyed his hands and feet. His parents abandoned him and the Palestinian government won’t pay for his care. But his grandfather has raised him instead, and Israeli doctors privately fundraise to cover his medical costs. As a result, the Palestinian toddler calls his grandfather “daddy,” he babbles in a mix of Hebrew and Arabic and the only home he has ever known is the yellow-painted children’s ward. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)

Associated Press
In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, puts his grandson Mohammed in a wheelchair in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and tragedy have each shaken Mohammed al-Farra’s life since he was born in the southern Gaza Strip town of Khan Younis three and a half years ago with a rare genetic disorder that crippled his bowels, weakened his immune system and caused an infection that destroyed his hands and feet. His parents abandoned him and the Palestinian government won’t pay for his care. But his grandfather has raised him instead, and Israeli doctors privately fundraise to cover his medical costs. As a result, the Palestinian toddler calls his grandfather “daddy,” he babbles in a mix of Hebrew and Arabic and the only home he has ever known is the yellow-painted children’s ward. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)
In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, puts his grandson Mohammed in a wheelchair in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and tragedy have each shaken Mohammed al-Farra’s life since he was born in the southern Gaza Strip town of Khan Younis three and a half years ago with a rare genetic disorder that crippled his bowels, weakened his immune system and caused an infection that destroyed his hands and feet. His parents abandoned him and the Palestinian government won’t pay for his care. But his grandfather has raised him instead, and Israeli doctors privately fundraise to cover his medical costs. As a result, the Palestinian toddler calls his grandfather “daddy,” he babbles in a mix of Hebrew and Arabic and the only home he has ever known is the yellow-painted children’s ward. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)
View Comments (0)