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In this Monday, Feb. 4, 2013 photo, the statue of the head of an eagle hangs in a conference room at the U.S. Interests Section in Havana, Cuba. Following the doomed, U.S.-backed Bay of Pigs invasion, the more than 3-ton eagle statue was ripped from the USS Main monument during an anti-American protest and splintered into pieces. The Maine eagle's head was mysteriously delivered to Swiss diplomats, who had agreed to act as protectors of U.S. property in Cuba. Today it hangs in this conference room at the U.S. Interests Section, which Washington maintains in Havana instead of an embassy. (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)

Associated Press
In this Monday, Feb. 4, 2013 photo, the statue of the head of an eagle hangs in a conference room at the U.S. Interests Section in Havana, Cuba. Following the doomed, U.S.-backed Bay of Pigs invasion, the more than 3-ton eagle statue was ripped from the USS Main monument during an anti-American protest and splintered into pieces. The Maine eagle's head was mysteriously delivered to Swiss diplomats, who had agreed to act as protectors of U.S. property in Cuba. Today it hangs in this conference room at the U.S. Interests Section, which Washington maintains in Havana instead of an embassy. (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
In this Monday, Feb. 4, 2013 photo, the statue of the head of an eagle hangs in a conference room at the U.S. Interests Section in Havana, Cuba. Following the doomed, U.S.-backed Bay of Pigs invasion, the more than 3-ton eagle statue was ripped from the USS Main monument during an anti-American protest and splintered into pieces. The Maine eagle's head was mysteriously delivered to Swiss diplomats, who had agreed to act as protectors of U.S. property in Cuba. Today it hangs in this conference room at the U.S. Interests Section, which Washington maintains in Havana instead of an embassy. (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
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