In this Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, Libyan militant members of Ansar al-Shariah Brigades stand in front the gate of their compound, in Benghazi, Libya. Suspicion in last week's deadly attack that killed the American ambassador to Libya has focused on members of a hardcore Islamist militia known for its sympathies to al-Qaida, its fierce animosity to the U.S. and its intimidation of Muslims who don't conform to its strident ideology. Ansar al-Shariah is among the most powerful of the many, heavily armed militias that the government relies on to keep security in Benghazi. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)

Associated Press
In this Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, Libyan militant members of Ansar al-Shariah Brigades stand in front the gate of their compound, in Benghazi, Libya. Suspicion in last week's deadly attack that killed the American ambassador to Libya has focused on members of a hardcore Islamist militia known for its sympathies to al-Qaida, its fierce animosity to the U.S. and its intimidation of Muslims who don't conform to its strident ideology. Ansar al-Shariah is among the most powerful of the many, heavily armed militias that the government relies on to keep security in Benghazi. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)
In this Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, Libyan militant members of Ansar al-Shariah Brigades stand in front the gate of their compound, in Benghazi, Libya. Suspicion in last week's deadly attack that killed the American ambassador to Libya has focused on members of a hardcore Islamist militia known for its sympathies to al-Qaida, its fierce animosity to the U.S. and its intimidation of Muslims who don't conform to its strident ideology. Ansar al-Shariah is among the most powerful of the many, heavily armed militias that the government relies on to keep security in Benghazi. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)
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