In this Monday, Sept. 17, 2012 photo, a general view of Benghazi, Libya. In front of Benghazi’s stock market, pedestrians step around lakes of sewage in the street. The grandest hotel in Libya’s second largest city is a gloomy, state-owned bulk, with broken windows and dim corridors. Last week’s deadly attack on the U.S. Consulate was just one sign of how the city is a tough customer: Benghazans are bitter over decades of neglect and humiliation under Moammar Gadhafi and they rumble with discontent that the new leadership in Tripoli still doesn’t treat them as equals. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)

Associated Press
In this Monday, Sept. 17, 2012 photo, a general view of Benghazi, Libya. In front of Benghazi’s stock market, pedestrians step around lakes of sewage in the street. The grandest hotel in Libya’s second largest city is a gloomy, state-owned bulk, with broken windows and dim corridors. Last week’s deadly attack on the U.S. Consulate was just one sign of how the city is a tough customer: Benghazans are bitter over decades of neglect and humiliation under Moammar Gadhafi and they rumble with discontent that the new leadership in Tripoli still doesn’t treat them as equals. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)
In this Monday, Sept. 17, 2012 photo, a general view of Benghazi, Libya. In front of Benghazi’s stock market, pedestrians step around lakes of sewage in the street. The grandest hotel in Libya’s second largest city is a gloomy, state-owned bulk, with broken windows and dim corridors. Last week’s deadly attack on the U.S. Consulate was just one sign of how the city is a tough customer: Benghazans are bitter over decades of neglect and humiliation under Moammar Gadhafi and they rumble with discontent that the new leadership in Tripoli still doesn’t treat them as equals. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)
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