Nana Akufo-Addo, center, presidential candidate of the opposition New Patriotic Party, addresses supporters during a rally protesting the results of last Friday's presidential election, in Accra, Ghana, on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2012. Ghana's opposition party said Tuesday that they plan to contest the results of the election, ignoring the appeals of the international community, which fears that a protracted political fight could destabilize one of the only established democracies in the region. Akufo-Addo, who lost the 2008 presidential election by less than one percent, finished with 47.7 percent of Friday's vote, placing him second behind President John Dramani Mahama. (AP Photo/Gabriela Barnuevo)

Associated Press
Nana Akufo-Addo, center, presidential candidate of the opposition New Patriotic Party, addresses supporters during a rally protesting the results of last Friday's presidential election, in Accra, Ghana, on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2012. Ghana's opposition party said Tuesday that they plan to contest the results of the election, ignoring the appeals of the international community, which fears that a protracted political fight could destabilize one of the only established democracies in the region. Akufo-Addo, who lost the 2008 presidential election by less than one percent, finished with 47.7 percent of Friday's vote, placing him second behind President John Dramani Mahama. (AP Photo/Gabriela Barnuevo)
Nana Akufo-Addo, center, presidential candidate of the opposition New Patriotic Party, addresses supporters during a rally protesting the results of last Friday's presidential election, in Accra, Ghana, on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2012. Ghana's opposition party said Tuesday that they plan to contest the results of the election, ignoring the appeals of the international community, which fears that a protracted political fight could destabilize one of the only established democracies in the region. Akufo-Addo, who lost the 2008 presidential election by less than one percent, finished with 47.7 percent of Friday's vote, placing him second behind President John Dramani Mahama. (AP Photo/Gabriela Barnuevo)
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