A new Quinnipiac poll has found a significant shift in public opinion on the trade-off between civil liberties and national security. A new Quinnipiac poll has found a significant shift in public ... more 
A new Quinnipiac poll has found a significant shift in public opinion on the trade-off between civil liberties and national security. A new Quinnipiac poll has found a significant shift in public opinion on the trade-off between civil liberties and national security. In the new survey, 45 percent of the public said they thought the government?s antiterrorism policies have ?gone too far in restricting the average person?s civil liberties? compared with 40 percent who said they have ?not gone far enough to adequately protect the country.? By comparison, in a January 2010 Quinnipiac poll that posed the same question, only 25 percent of the public said the government had gone too far in restricting civil liberties, while 63 percent said it hadn?t gone far enough to protect the country. Just over a month after his court martial began, Pfc. Bradley Manning's defense team began to present its case in a Maryland military court. The brainiacs at MIT created a cool visualization program to map how the National Security Agency can understand your relationships based on who you contact via email and how often. While we still don't know whether the NSA is collecting the content of phone calls and Internet activity, we know from court documents and Senate testimony that the government broadly mines so-called "meta-data" about whom users interact with. less 
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Wochit
Wed, Jul 10, 2013 6:03 PM EDT