The National Transportation Safety Board is looking at the flight crew's inputs into the autopilot and other cockpit automation systems during Asiana Flight 214's final minutes. The crew told ... more 
The National Transportation Safety Board is looking at the flight crew's inputs into the autopilot and other cockpit automation systems during Asiana Flight 214's final minutes. The crew told investigators they believed the autothrottles were on, which would have relieved them of managing the plane?s speed, and left them with only its altitude and course to manage among other minor settings but experts said some of the instructions that the crew gave the autopilot may have disabled the auto-throttles. Chief of the National Transportation Safety Board, Deborah Hersman, cautioned against jumping to any conclusion about what may be behind the crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco. "We're gathering factual information. We know a lot, and what we need to do is correlate all that information. We need to put it together and see what it tells us." NTSB investigators say the pilots of Asiana Flight 214 relied on automated cockpit equipment to control the jetliner's speed as they landed at San Francisco airport, but realized too late they were flying too low and too slow before the aircraft crashed. less 
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Wochit
Thu, Jul 11, 2013 7:17 PM EDT