This NOAA satellite image taken Sunday, June 19, 2011 at 10:45 AM EDT shows patches of scattered to widespread cloud cover over areas from the Upper Midwest through the Mid-Atlantic region as an ... more 
This NOAA satellite image taken Sunday, June 19, 2011 at 10:45 AM EDT shows patches of scattered to widespread cloud cover over areas from the Upper Midwest through the Mid-Atlantic region as an active weather pattern develops in the eastern half of the nation. Showers and thunderstorms develop in the portions of the Mid-Atlantic through the afternoon as a cold front exits the region. Behind this activity waves of low pressure and warm fronts lift through the Midwest and the Ohio Valley, spreading plenty of warm moisture from the Gulf of Mexico northward. These features spark rain and thunderstorms in parts of the Upper Great Lakes and the Ohio, Tennessee, and Mid-Mississippi Valleys through the afternoon. There is a slight risk of severe thunderstorm development from the Central and Northern Plains into the Ohio and Tennessee Valleys and Carolinas. Further west, a low pressure system associated with a trough of low pressure over the West deepens and creates a moderate risk of severe weather development as it approaches the Central Plains. Severe storms in areas of northeastern Colorado, southern Nebraska, northern Kansas, southwestern Iowa and northwestern Missouri may produce large hail and tornadoes. The system also increases winds across the Southwest and the Southern Plains. Strong winds combined with single digit relative humidity levels and near record breaking daytime temperatures in these regions create critical to extremely critical fire weather conditions from southern Utah and Arizona through Texas and western Oklahoma, and southwestern Kansas. (AP PHOTO/WEATHER UNDERGROUND) less 
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Associated Press
Sun, Jun 19, 2011 3:10 PM EDT