2012 YEAR IN REVIEW

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  • No One Knows Why or How the Brooklyn Bridge's American Flags Were Painted White
    No One Knows Why or How the Brooklyn Bridge's American Flags Were Painted White

    Overnight, someone climbed to the top of both the Brooklyn Bridge's two 273-foot towers. According to officials, the American flags are hung by specially trained workers in the Department of Transportation. At the least police are folding up the Brooklyn Bridge white surrender flag in a respectful manner. Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams announced an award for any information about the mysterious flags.

  • Real's headline catch Rodriguez unveiled to huge crowd at Bernabeu
    Real's headline catch Rodriguez unveiled to huge crowd at Bernabeu

    Colombia's World Cup revelation James Rodriguez was unveiled as Real Madrid's latest headline signing in front of tens of thousands of fans at the Santiago Bernabeu on Tuesday. Rodriguez, the top scorer at the World Cup in Brazil, has moved to the European champions from Monaco on a six-season contract. Spanish media said Real paid about €80 million ($108m) for the 23-year-old playmaker, which if correct would make him the fifth most expensive player in history after Gareth Bale, Cristiano Ronaldo, Neymar and Luis Suarez. "It's a lot of pressure to be here but I'm ready to take it on," said Colombia's poster boy, looking relaxed and smiling and sporting Real's number 10 shirt - last worn by Mesut Ozil.

  • Why Legos keep washing up on a British beach
    Why Legos keep washing up on a British beach

    For the last 17 years, Lego pieces have been washing up on the shores of Cornwall, England, to the delight of mystified beachgoers.

  • Why the economy is worse than you think
    Why the economy is worse than you think

    Milken fellow and Wall Street strategist Komal Sri Kumar on why the economic picture isn't as rosy as it looks

  • Schizophrenia has many genetic links, study says

    By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK - More than 100 locations on the human genome may play a role in a person’s risk of developing schizophrenia, according to a new study. While the results do not have an immediate effect on those living with the psychiatric disorder, one of the study’s authors said they open areas of research that had not seen advances in recent years. "The exciting thing about having little openings is it gives you a place to dig and make big openings,” said Steve McCarroll, director of genetics for the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts. McCarroll is part of the Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, which published the study in the journal Nature.

  • Israel pounds Gaza despite international peace efforts
    Israel pounds Gaza despite international peace efforts

    By Nidal al-Mughrabi and Jeffrey Heller GAZA/JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel pounded targets across the Gaza Strip on Tuesday, saying no ceasefire was near as top U.S. and United Nations diplomats pursued talks on halting the fighting that has claimed more than 600 lives. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry held discussions in neighbouring Egypt, while U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon met Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Tel Aviv and later with the Palestinian prime minister in the occupied West Bank. Dealing a blow to Israel's economy already reeling from a spate of tourism cancellations, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) took the rare step of banning U.S. carriers from flying to or from Ben-Gurion International Airport for at least 24 hours after a rocket fired from Gaza struck near the airport's fringes, injuring two people. Israel's flagship carrier El Al continued flights as usual.

  • U.S. CDC says it 'may never know' how bird flu mishap occurred

    By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "may never know" how a fairly harmless form of bird flu was cross-contaminated with a dangerous bird flu strain before it was sent to a laboratory outside of the CDC, an agency spokesman said on Monday. The CDC disclosed the bird flu incident as part of an internal investigation into the agency's mishandling of live anthrax in June, potentially exposing dozens of its own lab workers to the pathogen. While no humans fell ill as a result of the bird flu breach, CDC Director Dr Thomas Frieden has called it “the most distressing" in a series of safety breaches at the agency because of the public risk posed by the virus.

  • Obama vows U.S. will seek justice in downing of Malaysian jet
    Obama vows U.S. will seek justice in downing of Malaysian jet

    By Roberta Rampton and Steve Holland WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States will not rest until justice is done in the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH-17 over eastern Ukraine, President Barack Obama vowed in a condolence book for the nearly 300 victims on Tuesday. U.S. lawmakers, meanwhile, pushed for a stronger response to the July 17 shootdown of the airliner over an area controlled by pro-Russia separatists. Obama visited the Netherlands Embassy in Washington to sign the book.

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