In this Nov. 25, 2012 photo, people walk in Paseo Cayala, a nearly independent city on the edges of Guatemala City. Eventually, the Cayala Management Group hopes to expand the project into "Cayala City," spreading across an area a little larger than New York's Central Park. Some urbanists and architects are skeptical the project can thrive over the long term in a country with one of the world's highest homicide rates and with roughly half of its 14 million people in poverty. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

Associated Press
In this Nov. 25, 2012 photo, people walk in Paseo Cayala, a nearly independent city on the edges of Guatemala City. Eventually, the Cayala Management Group hopes to expand the project into "Cayala City," spreading across an area a little larger than New York's Central Park. Some urbanists and architects are skeptical the project can thrive over the long term in a country with one of the world's highest homicide rates and with roughly half of its 14 million people in poverty.  (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
In this Nov. 25, 2012 photo, people walk in Paseo Cayala, a nearly independent city on the edges of Guatemala City. Eventually, the Cayala Management Group hopes to expand the project into "Cayala City," spreading across an area a little larger than New York's Central Park. Some urbanists and architects are skeptical the project can thrive over the long term in a country with one of the world's highest homicide rates and with roughly half of its 14 million people in poverty. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
View Comments (1)