In this Nov. 4, 2012 photo, health workers measure the height of a boy during a mobile clinic to identify cases of underweight, stunted, or malnourished children, in Michemire, in the Mao region of Chad. A survey conducted in the county found that 51.9 percent of the children are stunted, one of the highest rates in the world, according to a summary published by UNICEF. Stunting is the result of having either too few calories, too little variety, or both. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Associated Press
In this Nov. 4, 2012 photo, health workers measure the height of a boy during a mobile clinic to identify cases of underweight, stunted, or malnourished children, in Michemire, in the Mao region of Chad. A survey conducted in the county found that 51.9 percent of the children are stunted, one of the highest rates in the world, according to a summary published by UNICEF. Stunting is the result of having either too few calories, too little variety, or both. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
In this Nov. 4, 2012 photo, health workers measure the height of a boy during a mobile clinic to identify cases of underweight, stunted, or malnourished children, in Michemire, in the Mao region of Chad. A survey conducted in the county found that 51.9 percent of the children are stunted, one of the highest rates in the world, according to a summary published by UNICEF. Stunting is the result of having either too few calories, too little variety, or both. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
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