In this Oct. 12, 2012 photo an Ultra-orthodox Jewish man blows a trumpet to announce the starting of the Sabbath, Judaism's biblically-mandated day of rest, at the Mahane Yehuda market in Jerusalem. Though most Israelis are secular, Israel’s founding fathers gave Judaism a formal place in the country’s affairs and Ultra-Orthodox rabbis strictly govern Jewish practices such as weddings, divorces, and burials. The Ultra-Orthodox are also perennial kingmakers in Israeli coalition politics, though they make up only ten percent of the country’s population. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

Associated Press
In this Oct. 12, 2012 photo an Ultra-orthodox Jewish man blows a trumpet to announce the starting of the Sabbath, Judaism's biblically-mandated day of rest, at the Mahane Yehuda market in Jerusalem. Though most Israelis are secular, Israel’s founding fathers gave Judaism a formal place in the country’s affairs and Ultra-Orthodox rabbis strictly govern Jewish practices such as weddings, divorces, and burials. The Ultra-Orthodox are also perennial kingmakers in Israeli coalition politics, though they make up only ten percent of the country’s population. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
In this Oct. 12, 2012 photo an Ultra-orthodox Jewish man blows a trumpet to announce the starting of the Sabbath, Judaism's biblically-mandated day of rest, at the Mahane Yehuda market in Jerusalem. Though most Israelis are secular, Israel’s founding fathers gave Judaism a formal place in the country’s affairs and Ultra-Orthodox rabbis strictly govern Jewish practices such as weddings, divorces, and burials. The Ultra-Orthodox are also perennial kingmakers in Israeli coalition politics, though they make up only ten percent of the country’s population. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
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