In this Oct. 2, 2012, photo, Georgina Castaneda, a new citizen who registered to vote Democratic at a swearing-in ceremony in March, when she took the U.S. citizenship oath, poses for a photo at her home in Los Angeles. From Florida to Massachusetts and Iowa to California, candidates and political parties seeking to squeeze every vote they can from a divided electorate are targeting America's newest citizens, a bloc relatively small in number but substantial enough to make a difference in presidential swing states. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Associated Press
In this Oct. 2, 2012, photo, Georgina Castaneda, a new citizen who registered to vote Democratic at a swearing-in ceremony in March, when she took the U.S. citizenship oath, poses for a photo at her home in Los Angeles. From Florida to Massachusetts and Iowa to California, candidates and political parties seeking to squeeze every vote they can from a divided electorate are targeting America's newest citizens, a bloc relatively small in number but substantial enough to make a difference in presidential swing states. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
In this Oct. 2, 2012, photo, Georgina Castaneda, a new citizen who registered to vote Democratic at a swearing-in ceremony in March, when she took the U.S. citizenship oath, poses for a photo at her home in Los Angeles. From Florida to Massachusetts and Iowa to California, candidates and political parties seeking to squeeze every vote they can from a divided electorate are targeting America's newest citizens, a bloc relatively small in number but substantial enough to make a difference in presidential swing states. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
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