A Pakistani youth pushes his motorcycle, with balloons that he hopes to sell on Valentine's Day, in Islamabad, Pakistan, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013. Romance may not be dead in Pakistan but it is under attack. Conservatives in Pakistan are attacking the romantic holiday as a western-inspired event helping to spread vulgarity in their country and putting up posters calling on people to boycott the holiday. But romantics are fighting back with an arsenal of flowers, pink teddy bears and heart-shaped balloons. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)

Associated Press
A Pakistani youth pushes his motorcycle, with balloons that he hopes to sell on Valentine's Day, in Islamabad, Pakistan, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013. Romance may not be dead in Pakistan but it is under attack. Conservatives in Pakistan are attacking the romantic holiday as a western-inspired event helping to spread vulgarity in their country and putting up posters calling on people to boycott the holiday. But romantics are fighting back with an arsenal of flowers, pink teddy bears and heart-shaped balloons. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)
A Pakistani youth pushes his motorcycle, with balloons that he hopes to sell on Valentine's Day, in Islamabad, Pakistan, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013. Romance may not be dead in Pakistan but it is under attack. Conservatives in Pakistan are attacking the romantic holiday as a western-inspired event helping to spread vulgarity in their country and putting up posters calling on people to boycott the holiday. But romantics are fighting back with an arsenal of flowers, pink teddy bears and heart-shaped balloons. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)
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