Passengers traveling to Kano seated inside a train in Lagos, Nigeria Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Nigeria has built railroad tracks connecting its commercial heartbeat in the south to its largest city in the north, in a bid to revive Africa’s most populous moribund railway system. Minister of Transport Idris Umar said at Lagos’ Ebute-Metta Terminus Friday that the new Lagos-Kano route would boost the economy. Tracks connecting the cities, 720 miles (1160 kilometers) apart, were first built in 1912. But corruption and neglect had rendered about 70 percent of the tracks unusable as of early last year. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)

Associated Press
Passengers traveling to Kano seated inside a train in Lagos, Nigeria  Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Nigeria has built railroad tracks connecting its commercial heartbeat in the south to its largest city in the north, in a bid to revive Africa’s most populous moribund railway system. Minister of Transport Idris Umar said at Lagos’ Ebute-Metta Terminus Friday that the new Lagos-Kano route would boost the economy. Tracks connecting the cities, 720 miles (1160 kilometers) apart, were first built in 1912. But corruption and neglect had rendered about 70 percent of the tracks unusable as of early last year. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
Passengers traveling to Kano seated inside a train in Lagos, Nigeria Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Nigeria has built railroad tracks connecting its commercial heartbeat in the south to its largest city in the north, in a bid to revive Africa’s most populous moribund railway system. Minister of Transport Idris Umar said at Lagos’ Ebute-Metta Terminus Friday that the new Lagos-Kano route would boost the economy. Tracks connecting the cities, 720 miles (1160 kilometers) apart, were first built in 1912. But corruption and neglect had rendered about 70 percent of the tracks unusable as of early last year. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
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