People enter the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012. Sixty years after a landmark accord started German government compensation for victims of Nazi crimes, fund administrators and German officials say payments to Holocaust survivors are needed more than ever as they enter their final years. In acknowledgement of that, German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble was to sign off officially Thursday on revisions to the original 1952 compensation treaty, increasing pensions for those living in eastern Europe and broadening who is eligible for payments. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

Associated Press
People enter the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012. Sixty years after a landmark accord started German government compensation for victims of Nazi crimes, fund administrators and German officials say payments to Holocaust survivors are needed more than ever as they enter their final years. In acknowledgement of that, German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble was to sign off officially Thursday on revisions to the original 1952 compensation treaty, increasing pensions for those living in eastern Europe and broadening who is eligible for payments.  (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
People enter the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012. Sixty years after a landmark accord started German government compensation for victims of Nazi crimes, fund administrators and German officials say payments to Holocaust survivors are needed more than ever as they enter their final years. In acknowledgement of that, German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble was to sign off officially Thursday on revisions to the original 1952 compensation treaty, increasing pensions for those living in eastern Europe and broadening who is eligible for payments. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
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