People withdraw money from cash machines where election propaganda supporting Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez cover the nearby walls in Caracas, Venezuela, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Venezuela's government announced Friday that it is devaluing the country's currency, a long-anticipated change expected to push up prices in the heavily import-reliant economy. Officials said the fixed exchange rate is changing from 4.30 bolivars to the dollar to 6.30 bolivars to the dollar. Venezuela's government has had strict currency exchange controls since 2003 and maintains a fixed, government-set exchange rate. While those controls have restricted the amounts of dollars available at the official rate, an illegal black market has flourished and the value of the bolivar has recently been eroding. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

Associated Press
People withdraw money from cash machines where election propaganda supporting Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez cover the nearby walls in Caracas, Venezuela, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Venezuela's government announced Friday that it is devaluing the country's currency, a long-anticipated change expected to push up prices in the heavily import-reliant economy. Officials said the fixed exchange rate is changing from 4.30 bolivars to the dollar to 6.30 bolivars to the dollar. Venezuela's government has had strict currency exchange controls since 2003 and maintains a fixed, government-set exchange rate. While those controls have restricted the amounts of dollars available at the official rate, an illegal black market has flourished and the value of the bolivar has recently been eroding. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)
People withdraw money from cash machines where election propaganda supporting Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez cover the nearby walls in Caracas, Venezuela, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Venezuela's government announced Friday that it is devaluing the country's currency, a long-anticipated change expected to push up prices in the heavily import-reliant economy. Officials said the fixed exchange rate is changing from 4.30 bolivars to the dollar to 6.30 bolivars to the dollar. Venezuela's government has had strict currency exchange controls since 2003 and maintains a fixed, government-set exchange rate. While those controls have restricted the amounts of dollars available at the official rate, an illegal black market has flourished and the value of the bolivar has recently been eroding. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)
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