This 2012 photo provided by the journal Science shows a female Humpback whale named Filament lobtailing prior to feeding dive. Some wild animals seem to follow the same monkey-see, monkey-do social ... more 
This 2012 photo provided by the journal Science shows a female Humpback whale named Filament lobtailing prior to feeding dive. Some wild animals seem to follow the same monkey-see, monkey-do social conformity in the quest for good food that people do, a new study finds. Monkeys in South Africa instantly switched food choices _ to something they used to avoid _ purely because of peer pressure, like teenagers in high school, scientists say. And generations of humpback whales off the coast of New England learned a new feeding technique from watching what worked for one of them, according to two studies in Thursday's journal Science. (AP Photo/Jennifer Allen, Ocean Alliance) less 
1 / 30
Associated Press | Photo By Jennifer Allen, Ocean Alliance
Thu, Apr 25, 2013 2:08 PM EDT