In this photo taken on 13 March 2012, Nguyen Huong Giang, 24, grinds rhinoceros horn with water at her apartment in Hanoi, Vietnam, demonstrating how she makes a liquid concoction she ingests after drinking too much alcohol or when suffering from allergies. Wildlife conservationists warn that Vietnam’s surging demand for such horns, which are believed to treat everything from hangovers to cancer, is threatening to wipe out the world’s remaining rhino populations. Illegal killings in Africa hit a record high in 2011 and are expected to worsen this year. (AP Photo/Na Son Nguyen)

Associated Press
In this photo taken on 13 March 2012, Nguyen Huong Giang, 24, grinds rhinoceros horn with water at her apartment in Hanoi, Vietnam, demonstrating how she makes a liquid concoction she ingests after drinking too much alcohol or when suffering from allergies. Wildlife conservationists warn that Vietnam’s surging demand for such horns, which are believed to treat everything from hangovers to cancer, is threatening to wipe out the world’s remaining rhino populations. Illegal killings in Africa hit a record high in 2011 and are expected to worsen this year. (AP Photo/Na Son Nguyen)
In this photo taken on 13 March 2012, Nguyen Huong Giang, 24, grinds rhinoceros horn with water at her apartment in Hanoi, Vietnam, demonstrating how she makes a liquid concoction she ingests after drinking too much alcohol or when suffering from allergies. Wildlife conservationists warn that Vietnam’s surging demand for such horns, which are believed to treat everything from hangovers to cancer, is threatening to wipe out the world’s remaining rhino populations. Illegal killings in Africa hit a record high in 2011 and are expected to worsen this year. (AP Photo/Na Son Nguyen)
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