In this photo taken July 26, 2012, Marge Youngs adjusts the flame on her stove at her home in Toledo, Ohio. When given a choice on how to fix Social Security's serious long-term financial problems, 53 percent of adults said they would rather raise taxes than cut benefits for future generations, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll. "Right now, it seems like we're taxed so much, but if that would be the only way to go, I guess I'd have to be for it to preserve it," said Youngs, a 77-year-old widow. "It's extremely important to me. It's most of my income." (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

Associated Press
In this photo taken July 26, 2012, Marge Youngs adjusts the flame on her stove at her home in Toledo, Ohio. When given a choice on how to fix Social Security's serious long-term financial problems, 53 percent of adults said they would rather raise taxes than cut benefits for future generations, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll. "Right now, it seems like we're taxed so much, but if that would be the only way to go, I guess I'd have to be for it to preserve it," said Youngs, a 77-year-old widow. "It's extremely important to me. It's most of my income." (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
In this photo taken July 26, 2012, Marge Youngs adjusts the flame on her stove at her home in Toledo, Ohio. When given a choice on how to fix Social Security's serious long-term financial problems, 53 percent of adults said they would rather raise taxes than cut benefits for future generations, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll. "Right now, it seems like we're taxed so much, but if that would be the only way to go, I guess I'd have to be for it to preserve it," said Youngs, a 77-year-old widow. "It's extremely important to me. It's most of my income." (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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