In this photo taken March 30, 2009, file photo General Motors workers view President Barack Obama's talk about the auto industry bailout in Detroit. The government bailout of General Motors and Chrysler is one of the most polarizing issues of the presidential campaign. Many Americans wonder why $62 billion in tax dollars went to keeping the two automakers afloat in 2008 and 2009. There's little doubt the bailout saved the automakers and huge numbers of jobs. But there's also little chance the government will get all its money back. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)

Associated Press
In this photo taken March 30, 2009, file photo General Motors workers view President Barack Obama's talk about the auto industry bailout in Detroit. The government bailout of General Motors and Chrysler is one of the most polarizing issues of the presidential campaign. Many Americans wonder why $62 billion in tax dollars went to keeping the two automakers afloat in 2008 and 2009. There's little doubt the bailout saved the automakers and huge numbers of jobs. But there's also little chance the government will get all its money back.   (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
In this photo taken March 30, 2009, file photo General Motors workers view President Barack Obama's talk about the auto industry bailout in Detroit. The government bailout of General Motors and Chrysler is one of the most polarizing issues of the presidential campaign. Many Americans wonder why $62 billion in tax dollars went to keeping the two automakers afloat in 2008 and 2009. There's little doubt the bailout saved the automakers and huge numbers of jobs. But there's also little chance the government will get all its money back. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
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