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In this photo taken Nov. 24, 2012, Lu Zhenghai, right, stands inside his ark-like vessel under construction in China's northwest Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. Lu Zhenghai is one of at least two men in China predicting a world-ending flood, come Dec. 21, the fateful day many believe the Maya set as the conclusion of their 5,125-year long-count calendar. Zhenghai has spent his life savings building the 70-foot-by-50-foot vessel powered by three diesel engines, according to state media. In Mexico's Mayan heartland, nobody is preparing for the end of the world; instead, they're bracing for a tsunami of spiritual visitors. (AP Photo/ANPF-Chen Jiansheng)

Associated Press
In this photo taken Nov. 24, 2012,  Lu Zhenghai, right, stands inside his ark-like vessel under construction in China's northwest Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. Lu Zhenghai is one of at least two men in China predicting a world-ending flood, come Dec. 21, the fateful day many believe the Maya set as the conclusion of their 5,125-year long-count calendar. Zhenghai has spent his life savings building the 70-foot-by-50-foot vessel powered by three diesel engines, according to state media. In Mexico's Mayan heartland, nobody is preparing for the end of the world; instead, they're bracing for a tsunami of spiritual visitors. (AP Photo/ANPF-Chen Jiansheng)
In this photo taken Nov. 24, 2012, Lu Zhenghai, right, stands inside his ark-like vessel under construction in China's northwest Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. Lu Zhenghai is one of at least two men in China predicting a world-ending flood, come Dec. 21, the fateful day many believe the Maya set as the conclusion of their 5,125-year long-count calendar. Zhenghai has spent his life savings building the 70-foot-by-50-foot vessel powered by three diesel engines, according to state media. In Mexico's Mayan heartland, nobody is preparing for the end of the world; instead, they're bracing for a tsunami of spiritual visitors. (AP Photo/ANPF-Chen Jiansheng)
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