In this photo taken Sept. 18, 2012, a North Korean walks at the Korean Film Studio in Pyongyang, North Korea. An international film festival opens Thursday, Sept. 20 in the unlikeliest of places: North Korea. Held every two years, the Pyongyang International Film Festival is the only time North Koreans get to see a wide array of foreign films on the big screen. It's also the only time foreigners are allowed into North Korean movie theaters to see films alongside the locals. Letters on the poster written in Japanese read: "Great king of Comedy, Chaplin Film Screening Week." (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

Associated Press
In this photo taken Sept. 18, 2012, a North Korean walks at the Korean Film Studio in Pyongyang, North Korea. An international film festival opens Thursday, Sept. 20 in the unlikeliest of places: North Korea. Held every two years, the Pyongyang International Film Festival is the only time North Koreans get to see a wide array of foreign films on the big screen. It's also the only time foreigners are allowed into North Korean movie theaters to see films alongside the locals. Letters on the poster written in Japanese read: "Great king of Comedy, Chaplin Film Screening Week." (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
In this photo taken Sept. 18, 2012, a North Korean walks at the Korean Film Studio in Pyongyang, North Korea. An international film festival opens Thursday, Sept. 20 in the unlikeliest of places: North Korea. Held every two years, the Pyongyang International Film Festival is the only time North Koreans get to see a wide array of foreign films on the big screen. It's also the only time foreigners are allowed into North Korean movie theaters to see films alongside the locals. Letters on the poster written in Japanese read: "Great king of Comedy, Chaplin Film Screening Week." (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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