In this photo taken Sept. 28, 2012, a paramilitary policeman guards his position while a portrait of the late communist leader Mao Zedong is moved to replace an old portrait on Tiananmen Gate in Beijing, China. The Chinese characters on the Tiananmen Gate read "Long Live." Despite China's dramatic transformation into an economic superpower, the authoritarian legacy of communist founder Mao Zedong continues to weigh heavily on the country's politics, leaving the vast majority of the population with little voice or knowledge of how their leaders are chosen. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

Associated Press
In this photo taken Sept. 28, 2012, a paramilitary policeman guards his position while a portrait of the late communist leader Mao Zedong is moved to replace an old portrait on Tiananmen Gate in Beijing, China. The Chinese characters on the Tiananmen Gate read "Long Live." Despite China's dramatic transformation into an economic superpower, the authoritarian legacy of communist founder Mao Zedong continues to weigh heavily on the country's politics, leaving the vast majority of the population with little voice or knowledge of how their leaders are chosen. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)
In this photo taken Sept. 28, 2012, a paramilitary policeman guards his position while a portrait of the late communist leader Mao Zedong is moved to replace an old portrait on Tiananmen Gate in Beijing, China. The Chinese characters on the Tiananmen Gate read "Long Live." Despite China's dramatic transformation into an economic superpower, the authoritarian legacy of communist founder Mao Zedong continues to weigh heavily on the country's politics, leaving the vast majority of the population with little voice or knowledge of how their leaders are chosen. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)
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