In this photo taken Thursday, Dec. 13, 2012, a recreational area is fenced off in an area where high levels of lead were recorded following Superstorm Sandy in Laurence Harbor, N.J. Federal and state officials say Sandy’s floodwaters didn’t cause problems at any of the 147 toxic waste or Superfund sites in the New York/New Jersey area. The Environmental Protection Agency says there’s no immediate threat to public health. But some experts say the storm created thousands of small pollution sites that could be even more challenging to track and clean up. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Associated Press
In this photo taken Thursday, Dec. 13, 2012, a recreational area is fenced off in an area where high levels of lead were recorded following Superstorm Sandy in Laurence Harbor, N.J. Federal and state officials say Sandy’s floodwaters didn’t cause problems at any of the 147 toxic waste or Superfund sites in the New York/New Jersey area. The Environmental Protection Agency says there’s no immediate threat to public health. But some experts say the storm created thousands of small pollution sites that could be even more challenging to track and clean up. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
In this photo taken Thursday, Dec. 13, 2012, a recreational area is fenced off in an area where high levels of lead were recorded following Superstorm Sandy in Laurence Harbor, N.J. Federal and state officials say Sandy’s floodwaters didn’t cause problems at any of the 147 toxic waste or Superfund sites in the New York/New Jersey area. The Environmental Protection Agency says there’s no immediate threat to public health. But some experts say the storm created thousands of small pollution sites that could be even more challenging to track and clean up. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
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